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The Australian National University

1993

Document: Discussion Paper

The key aim of this paper is to inject a degree of policy and economic realism into discussions about Aboriginal involvement in tourism. There is a growing policy impetus for an increased Aboriginal participation in tourism. From a macro-policy perspective, this is linked to a perception that 'Aboriginality' is one element that makes Australia a unique tourist destination and that an increased Aboriginal participation will result in greater potential for marketing the distinctiveness of the Australian experience.

Document: Discussion Paper

The position of young Aboriginal people in the labour market and the education system has been of great concern to policy-makers. The Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody, for example, drew attention to the importance of the lack of educational and employment opportunities while young in influencing the life chances of the people it reported on. Published information on this group is, however, limited. This paper aims to fill some of the gaps in knowledge concerning young Aborigines aged 15-24 years.

Document: Discussion Paper

Self-employment has been regarded as an important avenue for the social and economic advancement of some disadvantaged groups such as migrants. As measured by the census it has, however, remained of little importance to Aboriginal people. In 1986, only 1.3 per cent of the Aboriginal working-age population was self-employed compared with 10 per cent of other Australians of working age.

Document: Discussion Paper

The formation and evaluation of Aboriginal economic policy is heavily dependent upon data from the five-yearly census of population to establish the relative economic standing of Aboriginal people. This paper provides the first opportunity to assess some of the socioeconomic impacts of policies, such as the Aboriginal Employment Development Policy (AEDP), that were applied during the late 1980s and early 1990s.

Document: Discussion Paper

This paper is the first of two focusing on resource allocation policy and practice in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission (ATSIC). The current approach to the distribution of funds is examined here, while CAEPR Discussion Paper No. 42 examines the potential relevance and implications of fiscal equalisation for ATSIC's future funding policy and practice.

Document: Discussion Paper

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission (ATSIC) currently lacks integrated policy guidelines for its distribution of funds at regional, state and national levels. Smith (1993) examined ATSIC's existing financial powers and budgetary processes and argued that its financial objectives and the developing role of regional councils are hindered by the lack of funding policy and by an overly complex, functionally-based program structure.

Document: Discussion Paper

The focus of this paper is on the position of Aboriginal people over the age of 50 years in the labour market, as recorded in the 1986 Population Census. This group accounted for a smaller proportion of the adult Aboriginal population than this age group did in the Australian population in general. Aboriginal men and women in this age group were much less likely to be in paid employment than other Australians.

Document: Discussion Paper

It is well documented that Aboriginal people are less likely to be in employment and more likely to be unemployed or not in the labour force than are other Australians. The aim of this paper is to consider some of the reasons for these differences in the statistical framework of a multinomial regression equation.

Document: Discussion Paper

The Aboriginal Employment Development Policy (AEDP) aims to achieve economic equality between Indigenous and other Australians by the year 2000 via three goals: employment equality, income equality and commensurate levels of welfare dependence. Achieving employment equality, in statistical terms, for working-aged Indigenous Australians will require an increase in the employment rate from 27 percent of those aged 15-64 years to 63 percent.

Document: Discussion Paper

Social policy towards Indigenous Australians was fundamentally rethought in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The result is the current involvement in this policy area of large numbers of government agencies and programs across the range of functional responsibilities and at both State and Commonwealth levels of Australian government. The involvement of such a multiplicity of agencies and programs has recently been much criticised, most notably in the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody.

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