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The Australian National University

1991

Document: Discussion Paper

This paper presents social indicators of the Aboriginal population in the context of the rapid demographic change that has taken place in the population. The paper identifies the problem of Aboriginal data, the fuzziness of the definition of Aboriginality, the non-utility of a static population structure analysis as well as arguments over the exact size of the Aboriginal population in arriving at meaningful social indicators of the population.

Document: Discussion Paper

Despite the potential for government employment policies to influence the rate and incidence of migration among the Aboriginal workforce, little is known about the extent to which such policy impacts occur. This paper seeks to construct a base line for identifying these impacts by establishing the spatial structure of labour migration among the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population. It makes use of 1986 Census data to describe the volume and pattern of net and gross flows of working age Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders through the national settlement system.

Document: Discussion Paper

This paper is the second of two examining the effect of Aboriginality on employment and labour market status using data from the 1986 Population Census. It begins by presenting the data from the full-count of the 1986 Census showing that Aboriginal men and women had a lower employment rate (employment to population ratio) than non-Aboriginal men and women in each State and Territory and in each section-of-State.

Document: Discussion Paper

This paper attempts to identify the sources of special funding in Aboriginal affairs in Western Australia and how these allocations are spent. First, an assessment is made of the funds allocated by each level of government, Commonwealth, State and local; second, the funds allocated to programs and services with a social intent are compared with those allocated with an economic intent; and third, funds directed to remote regions are compared with those going to urban regions of Western Australia.

Document: Discussion Paper

Aboriginal people resident in, or traditional owners of, national parks have highly variably legal rights to harvest subsistence resources. In the absence of common law rights to Indigenous resources, a wide range of Commonwealth, State and Territory laws often obfuscate these rights. This paper sets out to outline in some detail, mainly in an appendix, Aboriginal harvesting rights in national parks Australia-wide.

Document: Discussion Paper

Aboriginal unemployment in Australia has reached chronic proportions. Official 1986 Census data estimate the Aboriginal unemployment rate at 35.3 per cent, almost four times higher than the equivalent rate for non-Aboriginal Australians. This paper examines various official statistics on Aboriginal unemployment and their underlying definitional frameworks and methodologies. Comparisons are made with data from research surveys and case studies using a wide range of definitions.

Document: Research Monograph

The papers in this volume, which are a selection of papers presented at an Academy of the Social Sciences in Australian workshop in March 1991, examine the employment status of Australian Aborigines and assess the prospects of meeting the target of Aboriginal employment equity by the year 2000 set by the Federal Government's Aboriginal Employment Development Policy (AEDP).

Published for the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia, 1991.

Document: Discussion Paper

This paper focuses specifically on income support options for Aboriginal Australians, and an attempt is made, for analytical purposes, to isolate income from employment issues. Particular attention is paid to the Aboriginal Employment Development Policy (AEDP) and its goal of achieving income equality between Aboriginal and other Australians by the year 2000, while simultaneously reducing the extent of Aboriginal welfare dependence to levels commensurate with those for the total population.

Document: Discussion Paper

This paper examines differences in Aboriginal socioeconomic status between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission (ATSIC) regions. The administration of programs administered by ATSIC Australia-wide have been largely decentralised into 60 regions under the Commonwealth Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission Act 1989. This is an exploratory regional analysis of Aboriginal socioeconomic status; it utilises 1986 Census data tabulations by ATSIC regions, which were produced by the Australian Bureau of Statistics for the Commission.

Document: Discussion Paper

Government assessment of the appropriateness and impact of policies and related programs aimed at improving the economic well-being of Aboriginal people could be considerably enhanced by the analysis of Aboriginal expenditure data. The Household Expenditure Survey (HES) conducted by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) is the major source of national expenditure data, but the absence of an Aboriginal identifier means that data collected on Aboriginal households cannot be extracted.

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