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The Australian National University

2016

Document: Research Monograph

The engagement of Indigenous Australians in economic activity is a matter of long-standing public concern and debate. Jon Altman has been intellectually engaged with Indigenous economic activity for almost 40 years, most prominently through his elaboration of the concept of the hybrid economy, and most recently through his sustained and trenchant critique of policy.

Document: Topical Issue

 

The Community Development Programme (CDP) is a remote-area Work for the Dole scheme that principally affects Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The program is billed by  the government as 'helping people find work, and allowing them to contribute to their communities and gain skills while looking for work.' But there is mounting evidence that CDP is creating significant hardship for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities, leading to increasing pressure for the scheme to be scrapped or radically overhauled.

Document: Research Monograph

As the global ‘data revolution’ accelerates, how can the data rights and interests of indigenous peoples be secured? Premised on the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, this book argues that indigenous peoples have inherent and inalienable rights relating to the collection, ownership and application of data about them, and about their lifeways and territories. As the first book to focus on indigenous data sovereignty, it asks: what does data sovereignty mean for indigenous peoples, and how is it being used in their pursuit of self-determination?

Document: Research Monograph

How can you make decisions about Aboriginal people when you can’t even talk to the people you’ve got here that are blackfellas?’ So ‘Sarah’, a senior Aboriginal public servant, imagines a conversation with the Northern Territory Public Service. Her question suggests tensions for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders who have accepted the long-standing invitation to join the ranks of the public service.

Document: Working Paper

‘Income management’ programs, restricting the way in which some recipients of government transfers can spend this money, have operated in Australia since 2007. The nature of the programs implemented varies considerably, including the mix of voluntary and compulsory elements, and differences in the scope and nature of targeting. A number of evaluations and other studies of these programs have been made.

Document: CAEPR Seminar

This seminar explores the themes of a research project into reciprocal accountability and the public value created by Aboriginal organisations in the Kimberley. The concept of public value was advanced by Moore in the early 1980s when neo-liberal public management first threatened to dominate the administrative apparatus of the Anglophone states. It has been refined since, and offers an alternative, now that neo-liberal public management faces widespread public disillusion.

Document: CAEPR Seminar

Since 2011, the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) has been collecting individual service level data from Indigenous primary health care organisations against a set of national key performance indicators. These indicators look at both the organisational processes and health outcomes in the areas of maternal and child health; preventative health and chronic disease management. The AIHW works with services to improve their data quality and return the data back to services to inform their own continuous quality improvement activities.

Document: CAEPR Seminar

Around the world the urgency, strength and legitimacy of Indigenous people's concerns, aspirations and values are increasing as Indigenous people exert their rights and treaties in the judicial courts, the political arena and the court of public opinion. As a result of land loss and severe control and limitations set by the various levels of gove