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The Australian National University

2013

Document: 2011 Census Papers

Where a person lives has the potential to shape their choices and outcomes. It is reasonably well established that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) Australians are more likely to live in remote areas than the non-Indigenous population and that this has implications for their ability to maintain important aspects of their life whilst, at the same time, constraining the services and jobs available to them. However, this paper demonstrates that even within an urban area, there is a large degree of residential segregation.

Document: 2011 Census Papers

The Indigenous population is projected to continue to grow at a much faster rate than the non-Indigenous population over at least the next 20 years. One explanation for this rapid growth is a high rate of mixed marriage partnerships with the children of these partnerships tending to be identified as Indigenous. In 2011, 56.5 per cent of partnered Indigenous males had a non-Indigenous partner, slightly lower than the corresponding figure of 59.0 per cent for Indigenous females.

Document: Topical Issue

Common property (communal land) is often viewed negatively with some claiming that communal land ownership and the absence of private property rights more generally have been insurmountable barriers to Indigenous enterprise. This paper provides a brief overview of common property resources and explores how Aboriginal common property is being used by some Aboriginal groups to develop social enterprises that provide benefits to remote communities, the environment and wider Australia.

Document: 2011 Census Papers

The aim of this paper is to provide a preliminary set of projections at the national and regional level for the Australian Indigenous population. Using population estimates from the Australian Bureau of Statistics and the most recently available vital-statistics data, it is projected that the Indigenous population will grow from around 670,000 in 2011 to around 1,060,000 by 2031. The Indigenous population is therefore projected to grow from around 3.0 per cent of the total population in 2011 to 3.9 per cent by 2031.

Document: Staff Publication

Hunt, J. 'Engagement with Indigenous communities in key sectors', Resource sheet No. 23, produced for the Closing the Gap Clearinghouse, October, available at http://www.aihw.gov.au/uploadedFiles/ClosingTheGap/Content/Publications/2013/ctgc-rs23.pdf.

Document: Staff Publication

Hunt, J. 'Engaging with Indigenous Australia—exploring the conditions for effective relationships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities', Issues paper No. 5 produced for the Closing the Gap Clearinghouse, October, available at http://www.aihw.gov.au/uploadedFiles/ClosingTheGap/Content/Publications/2013/ctgc-ip5.pdf.

Document: Staff Publication

Daly, A. and Smith, D.E. ‘Reforming Indigenous welfare policy: Salutary lessons and future challenges for Australia from the US experience’, Economic Papers, 22 (4): 28–44.

Document: 2011 Census Papers

CAEPR has a tradition of producing indices of Indigenous socioeconomic outcomes to support the work of Indigenous peoples and organisations in advocating for improved resources based on relative need, as well as of governments in targeting services where they will have the greatest impact on the Indigenous population. The aim of this paper is to replicate and extend this analysis. A number of insights emerge. First, leaving aside their own circumstances, Indigenous Australians were more likely to live in neighbourhoods where the rest of the population is relatively disadvantaged.

Document: 2011 Census Papers

Regional centres are an important but often overlooked set
of areas with particular policy and population dynamics. In
this paper, we identify 43 regional centres which we have
defined as having a total population of between 10,000 and
250,000 with at least 1,000 Indigenous usual residents.
These areas paper contain substantially more Indigenous
Australians overall than remote Indigenous communities
(23 per cent of the total Australian Indigenous population in
2011). However, the Indigenous population in these areas
tend to make up a greater share of the population than in

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