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2011 Census Papers

Document: 2011 Census Papers

Using a range of data—including the newly released Australian Census Longitudinal Dataset—this report presents a profile of Indigenous tertiary students and higher educational outcomes. An earlier report in this series reported improvements in the rate of Indigenous high school completion, both in absolute terms and relative to the non-Indigenous population.

Document: 2011 Census Papers

This report uses the recently released Australian Census Longitudinal Dataset to examine transitions into and out of home ownership from 2006 to 2011 among the Indigenous population.

Although home ownership may not fit with everyone's aspirations and circumstances, analysis previously undertaken by the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research identified that Indigenous adults and children who lived in a home that was owned or being purchased by the household had improved outcomes across a range of wellbeing measures.

Document: 2011 Census Papers

Where a person lives has the potential to shape their choices and outcomes. It is reasonably well established that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) Australians are more likely to live in remote areas than the non-Indigenous population and that this has implications for their ability to maintain important aspects of their life whilst, at the same time, constraining the services and jobs available to them. However, this paper demonstrates that even within an urban area, there is a large degree of residential segregation.

Document: 2011 Census Papers

The Indigenous population is projected to continue to grow at a much faster rate than the non-Indigenous population over at least the next 20 years. One explanation for this rapid growth is a high rate of mixed marriage partnerships with the children of these partnerships tending to be identified as Indigenous. In 2011, 56.5 per cent of partnered Indigenous males had a non-Indigenous partner, slightly lower than the corresponding figure of 59.0 per cent for Indigenous females.

Document: 2011 Census Papers

The aim of this paper is to provide a preliminary set of projections at the national and regional level for the Australian Indigenous population. Using population estimates from the Australian Bureau of Statistics and the most recently available vital-statistics data, it is projected that the Indigenous population will grow from around 670,000 in 2011 to around 1,060,000 by 2031. The Indigenous population is therefore projected to grow from around 3.0 per cent of the total population in 2011 to 3.9 per cent by 2031.

Document: 2011 Census Papers

CAEPR has a tradition of producing indices of Indigenous socioeconomic outcomes to support the work of Indigenous peoples and organisations in advocating for improved resources based on relative need, as well as of governments in targeting services where they will have the greatest impact on the Indigenous population. The aim of this paper is to replicate and extend this analysis. A number of insights emerge. First, leaving aside their own circumstances, Indigenous Australians were more likely to live in neighbourhoods where the rest of the population is relatively disadvantaged.

Document: 2011 Census Papers

Regional centres are an important but often overlooked set
of areas with particular policy and population dynamics. In
this paper, we identify 43 regional centres which we have
defined as having a total population of between 10,000 and
250,000 with at least 1,000 Indigenous usual residents.
These areas paper contain substantially more Indigenous
Australians overall than remote Indigenous communities
(23 per cent of the total Australian Indigenous population in
2011). However, the Indigenous population in these areas
tend to make up a greater share of the population than in

Document: 2011 Census Papers

This paper uses data from the 2006 and 2011 Censuses to analyse the distribution of income within the Indigenous population and to make comparisons with the non-Indigenous population. The results from the analysis are mixed. On the one hand, after taking into account inflation, average disposable income for the Indigenous population went up from $391 per week in 2006 to $488 per week in 2011.

Document: 2011 Census Papers

While recent research has found that there has been a substantial increase in Indigenous mainstream employment since the mid-1990s, there has been relatively little regional analysis of mainstream employment or the extent to which the nature of Indigenous employment has altered in what has been a period of substantial change in the Australian labour market. The aim of this paper is to build on the existing research using the 2006 and 2011 Censuses to provide a more disaggregated analysis of any changes in the nature of labour market outcomes for Indigenous Australians.

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