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Discussion Paper

Document: Discussion Paper

The idea that alcoholic drinks should be made available in licensed canteens or clubs in discrete Aboriginal communities has a contentious history in Australian public policy. This discussion paper aims to provide some historical depth to the latest resurgence of interest in the idea. The paper traces the social and policy changes that created a context within which it was thought that rationed sales of alcohol in home communities would encourage responsible drinking practices among Indigenous drinkers.

Document: Discussion Paper

This paper tracks the recent rise of ideology and evidence discourse as a way of describing good and bad Indigenous affairs policy. Expressing dissatisfaction with this discourse, it suggests a slightly more complex analytic way of thinking about Indigenous affairs involving three competing principles; equality, choice and guardianship. The paper suggests that dominant debates in Indigenous affairs balance these principles and move between them over time.

Document: Discussion Paper

The Aboriginal Employment Development Policy has three broad aims: employment, income and welfare dependency equality between Aboriginal and other Australians by the year 2000. The paper focuses primarily on the third and least scrutinised of these goals: the reduction of Aboriginal welfare dependency to levels commensurate with that of the total population. 1986 Census data are initially used to estimate the relative significance of Aboriginal employment and non-employment income in aggregate terms.

Document: Discussion Paper

Section 94(1) of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 1989 requires regional councils to 'formulate and revise from time to time a regional plan for improving the economic, social and cultural status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander residents of the region'. Guidelines for the preparation of such regional plans require that councils compile a data base on the demographic composition of their council area and to consider how various social indicators may differ in the future, say in the next five years.

Document: Discussion Paper

There is considerable evidence that the factors influencing Aboriginal employment differ from those affecting the general Australian population. This paper considers further evidence of the changes over time in Aboriginal employment as measured in the Censuses of 1971, 1976, 1981 and 1986. It asks two questions. First, has the Aboriginal population experienced different unemployment rates than the rest of the population?

Document: Discussion Paper

This paper describes the detailed industry composition of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workforce and measures the extent to which it differs from that of the rest of the workforce. For this purpose, 1986 Census data on industry division and class of employment are used and inter- and intra-industry segregation indexes are calculated. This reveals for the first time the precise industry mix which characterises the Aboriginal labour market.

Document: Discussion Paper

This paper considers some of the major issues involved in evaluating labour market programs for Aboriginal people in the light of the extensive United States (US) literature on the topic. The paper focuses on the US experience under the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA), with some reference to the Training for Aboriginals Program (TAP) in Australia. It first considers the need for clearly stated objectives in the formulation of labour market programs.

Document: Discussion Paper

Due to a lack of accurate data on the size, distribution and trends in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations in different geographic regions, past census data cannot be used for policy planning, administion or other uses. Data on the sex distribution of the Aboriginal and Islander populations by State and Territory are now available from the first count (released on 30 April 1992) of the 1991 Population Census.

Document: Discussion Paper

Until World War 2, Torres Strait Islanders were restricted in their distribution to the Torres Strait. Since that time, migration to the Australian mainland has contributed to a significant redistribution with the majority of Torres Strait Islanders now resident in the major cities of eastern Australia.

Document: Discussion Paper

An issues paper on 'Aborigines and Tourism' was commissioned by the Ecologically Sustainable Development (ESD) Tourism Working Group on 3 June 1991. It followed a verbal presentation on Aboriginal issues to the ESD Tourism Working Group by the authors in May 1991. The paper is divided into three parts, as specified in consultancy terms of reference:

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