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The Australian National University

Working Paper

Document: Working Paper

This study explores the subjective wellbeing of Indigenous Australians. We focus on mean levels of self-reported life satisfaction, inequality in life satisfaction within the Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian populations, and the prevalence and severity of dissatisfaction with one’s life. Evidence on differences in the determinants of life satisfaction between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians is provided. Results indicate that Indigenous life satisfaction peaked in 2003 and has since declined.

Document: Working Paper

Substantial recent growth in the number of Indigenous businesses means that the need for business-related skills in the Indigenous population will be greater than ever. This report reviews the existing literature relating to Indigenous students and business-related studies in Australia, and provides a snapshot of Indigenous students' participation in, and completion of, business-related higher education courses.

Document: Working Paper

This paper compares the level and source of income for Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians using data from the 2011 wave of the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey. Three sources of income are considered: wages and salaries; government benefits; and income from businesses, investments and other private transfers. Consistent with many previous studies, Indigenous Australians have, on average, lower total income than non-Indigenous Australians, with this difference being largest for those who are full-time employed.

Document: Working Paper

This report examines trends in participation in vocational education and training, and attainment of vocational qualifications, among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people during 2002–15. The report also investigates whether Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with a higher-level vocational qualification are more likely to subsequently gain employment than those with a lower-level vocational qualification.

Document: Working Paper

This report uses data from national health and social surveys of the Indigenous population, conducted between 2002 and 2012-13, to examine whether associations of some key social determinants with selected health and wellbeing outcomes changed over that time.

Consistently during the decade, employment status and housing tenure were significantly associated with a range of health and wellbeing outcomes for the Indigenous population.

Document: Working Paper

‘Income management’ programs, restricting the way in which some recipients of government transfers can spend this money, have operated in Australia since 2007. The nature of the programs implemented varies considerably, including the mix of voluntary and compulsory elements, and differences in the scope and nature of targeting. A number of evaluations and other studies of these programs have been made.

Document: Working Paper

CAEPR Working Paper 108/2016 described the number and pattern of social security penalties being applied to jobseekers participating in the Remote Jobs and Communities Program. The paper argued that more onerous requirements of jobseekers in the remote areas covered by that scheme was a major driver of their being overrepresented among those being penalised across the social security system.

Document: Working Paper

Despite some success in recruiting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to the Australian Public Service (APS), the long-term trend is one of declining representation. A fundamental issue is that rates of separation among Indigenous public servants remain consistently greater than those of their non-Indigenous counterparts.

Document: Working Paper

What are the factors that enable some Aboriginal organisations to drive positive change in their communities? This paper draws on interviews with leaders of successful Aboriginal organisations to understand the factors behind the successes that they are achieving in their communities. It explores how they define and assess success and what they see as the factors behind their achievements. It discusses the challenges and critical turning points they have faced and what enables them to sustain their success.

Document: Working Paper

This paper reviews literature related to the intersectionality of gender and educational attainment, with a special focus on the circumstances surrounding the Australian Indigenous population. Using two sources of data, the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) and the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), we conducted difference-in-difference analyses to better understand differences by gender between the non-Indigenous and the Indigenous in school attendance, school persistence and test scores.

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