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The Australian National University

Working Paper

Document: Working Paper

This study explores the subjective wellbeing of Indigenous Australians. We focus on mean levels of self-reported life satisfaction, inequality in life satisfaction within the Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian populations, and the prevalence and severity of dissatisfaction with one’s life. Evidence on differences in the determinants of life satisfaction between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians is provided. Results indicate that Indigenous life satisfaction peaked in 2003 and has since declined.

Document: Working Paper

Substantial recent growth in the number of Indigenous businesses means that the need for business-related skills in the Indigenous population will be greater than ever. This report reviews the existing literature relating to Indigenous students and business-related studies in Australia, and provides a snapshot of Indigenous students' participation in, and completion of, business-related higher education courses.

Document: Working Paper

This paper compares the level and source of income for Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians using data from the 2011 wave of the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey. Three sources of income are considered: wages and salaries; government benefits; and income from businesses, investments and other private transfers. Consistent with many previous studies, Indigenous Australians have, on average, lower total income than non-Indigenous Australians, with this difference being largest for those who are full-time employed.

Document: Working Paper

One of the major changes in Indigenous policy over the past decade and a half is the systematic reporting by government of socioeconomic and other outcomes of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population. Much, although not all, of this reporting makes comparisons with the non-Indigenous population. An increasing body of literature, however, cautions against using a 'deficits approach' to Indigenous statistics and data.

Document: Working Paper

The analysis presented in this report shows that, among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, better outcomes for socioeconomic indicators such as employment, education and income are positively associated with participation in arts and cultural expression. There is also strong evidence that those who participate in arts and cultural activities are more likely to have higher levels of subjective wellbeing.

Document: Working Paper

This paper describes Indigenous and non-Indigenous occupational mobility (i.e. changes in the skill level of an occupation in which an individual is employed) using the Australian Census Longitudinal Dataset, 2006-11.

Document: Working Paper

Some researchers have argued that strong periods of economic growth and economic downturns have a greater impact on the economic position of the Indigenous population than the non-Indigenous population in settler societies such as Australia and New Zealand. Māori have significantly higher levels of wellbeing than Indigenous Australians.

Document: Working Paper

This report examines trends in participation in vocational education and training, and attainment of vocational qualifications, among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people during 2002–15. The report also investigates whether Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with a higher-level vocational qualification are more likely to subsequently gain employment than those with a lower-level vocational qualification.

Document: Working Paper

This report uses data from national health and social surveys of the Indigenous population, conducted between 2002 and 2012-13, to examine whether associations of some key social determinants with selected health and wellbeing outcomes changed over that time.

Consistently during the decade, employment status and housing tenure were significantly associated with a range of health and wellbeing outcomes for the Indigenous population.

Document: Working Paper

‘Income management’ programs, restricting the way in which some recipients of government transfers can spend this money, have operated in Australia since 2007. The nature of the programs implemented varies considerably, including the mix of voluntary and compulsory elements, and differences in the scope and nature of targeting. A number of evaluations and other studies of these programs have been made.

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