Skip navigation
The Australian National University

Robert Levitus

Document: Staff Publication

Levitus, R. ‘Land rights and local economies: The Gagudju Association and the mirage of collective self-determination’, in D. Austin-Broos and G. Macdonald (eds), Culture, Economy and Governance in Aboriginal Australia, University of Sydney Press, Sydney, pp. 29–39.

Document: Staff Publication

Levitus, R. ‘Management and the model: Burning Kakadu’, in M. Minnegal (ed.), Sustainable Environments, Sustainable Communities: Potential Dialogues between Anthropologists, Scientists and Managers, Research Paper No. 21, School of Anthropology, Geography and Environmental Studies, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne.

Document: Staff Publication

Altman, J.C., Gray, M.C. and R. Levitus Skilling Indigenous Australia: Policy issues for the Community Development Employment Projects Scheme in Rural and Remote Australia, Chifley Research Centre, 38pp.

Document: Staff Publication

Levitus, R. 'Laws and strategies: The contest to protect Aboriginal interests at Coronation Hill', in J.F. Weiner and K. Glaskin (eds), Customary Land Tenure and Registration in Australia and Papua New Guinea: Anthropological Perspectives, ANU E Press, Canberra, pp. 247-72.

Document: Staff Publication

Levitus, R. 'Aboriginal organisations and development: The structural context', in J. Altman and D. Martin (eds), Power, Culture, Economy: Indigenous Australians and Mining, CAEPR Research Monograph No. 30, ANU E Press, Canberra, pp. 73-97.

Document: Discussion Paper

In response to post-war mining developments on Northern Territory Aboriginal reserves, policy innovations established the principles that a special rate of royalties could be levied on those developments and applied to the benefit of Northern Territory Aborigines, and that a proportion of those royalties should be reserved for the people of the area where mining was taking place. The Woodward Land Rights Commission accepted these two principles and also created Aboriginal land councils as a third class of beneficiary.

Document: Discussion Paper

The dispersal of the powers exercised and functions performed by the two major land councils has been the subject of debate and recommendations on a number of occasions since the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976 came into effect. The Reeves Review of the Act in 1998, and the subsequent Inquiry into that Review by the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs (HORSCATSIA) this year, have raised the issue to prominence again and ensured that it will be dealt with in the coming round of statutory amendments.

Document: Discussion Paper

One of the most important programs for Indigenous community and economic development is the Community Development Employment Projects (CDEP) scheme. CDEP employs around 35,000 Indigenous Australians and accounts for over one-quarter of total Indigenous employment. This paper reviews the evidence on the social and economic impacts of the scheme. The available evidence demonst