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The Australian National University

Seminar Topics—Series 2

Document: CAEPR Seminar

This seminar explores the themes of a research project into reciprocal accountability and the public value created by Aboriginal organisations in the Kimberley. The concept of public value was advanced by Moore in the early 1980s when neo-liberal public management first threatened to dominate the administrative apparatus of the Anglophone states. It has been refined since, and offers an alternative, now that neo-liberal public management faces widespread public disillusion.

Document: CAEPR Seminar

Since 2011, the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) has been collecting individual service level data from Indigenous primary health care organisations against a set of national key performance indicators. These indicators look at both the organisational processes and health outcomes in the areas of maternal and child health; preventative health and chronic disease management. The AIHW works with services to improve their data quality and return the data back to services to inform their own continuous quality improvement activities.

Document: CAEPR Seminar

Around the world the urgency, strength and legitimacy of Indigenous people's concerns, aspirations and values are increasing as Indigenous people exert their rights and treaties in the judicial courts, the political arena and the court of public opinion. As a result of land loss and severe control and limitations set by the various levels of government on the free use of and continuing benefit from their natural resources, Indigenous people have become increasingly dependent on welfare measures (United Nations, 2009: 24-25).

Document: CAEPR Seminar

A seminar co-hosted by the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research and the ANU Centre for Social Research and Methods

This seminar, presented by Greg Dresser and Eevon Chia from CareWest in Orange, will describe a range of research projects related to service delivery in regional New South Wales, a region with a large Aboriginal population. These projects cover topics such as access to community transport, telehealth and supporting older people to live independent lives.

Document: CAEPR Seminar

Ninety-nine percent of Australian university students are not of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent. Yet most graduates will enter occupations where their work will affect Indigenous Australians, either directly (in contact with Indigenous communities); or indirectly, in helping to build 21st century Australian society.

Document: CAEPR Seminar

When the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody produced its final report, it concluded that the high rate of Aboriginal deaths in custody stemmed from the over-representation of Aboriginal people in prisons and police lockups.

The Commission made more than 300 recommendations, most of which were designed to deal with this problem. The Keating Government accepted all bar one of the recommendations and allocated $672 million (in today's dollars) to put them into effect.

Document: CAEPR Seminar

This seminar explores how transformations in Australia's media landscape are impacting on public discussion of Indigenous policy issues. Previous research found the exclusive dialogue between political journalism and policy elites has worked to exclude Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people from the national conversation.

Document: CAEPR Seminar

Planning has many complicities, incongruities and prospects when it comes to recognising and protecting Indigenous rights in Planning.  Some recent developments are presenting an opportunity for Planning to address these matters comprehensively.

Document: CAEPR Seminar

In 2010 Yuendumu was wracked by conflict.  The Yuendumu Mediation and Justice Committee (YM&JC) was established as an innovative, responsive and highly effective Indigenous designed and driven initiative that has succeeded in restoring stability and harmony to the community.  It has played a powerful role in breaking cycles of disadvantage, distress and suffering caused by unmanaged community conflict and is a positive and compelling example of the drive, vision and commitment of Aboriginal people in Central Australia to take control and responsibility for matters in their com