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The Australian National University

Seminar Topics—Series 1

Document: CAEPR Seminar

This seminar will revisit my triangular conceptual framework for Australian Indigenous policy developed a decade ago. That framework identified three competing principles of equality, choice and guardianship. Equality was identified as the dominant principle at the top and centre of the policy space, but with three interpretations: individual legal equality, equality of opportunity and socio-economic equality.

Document: CAEPR Seminar

Indigenous people receive a greater proportion of their income from government income support payments than non-Indigenous Australians. Among those on income support, Indigenous people are also more likely to receive working age payments than the non-Indigenous population. Many of the changes to income support policy since the 1990s are likely to have had a disproportionate impact on the Indigenous population. Those payments that have decreased in generosity (at least in relative terms) are those that Indigenous Australians have a greater exposure to.

Document: CAEPR Seminar

This seminar provides an overview of the changing size and spatial distribution of the Indigenous population of Australia, comparing the results of the 2011 and 2016 censuses. The paper summarises four key aspects of the intercensal change:

a)    the growth in the estimated population of Indigenous Australians;

b)    the changing geographic distribution of  Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons;

c)    the spatial mismatch between demographic projections from the 2011 census and 2016 census counts; and

Document: CAEPR Seminar

The United States and Australia were among the four nations that initially voted against the UN General Assembly's Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.  Each country has since reconsidered its position and ultimately elected to endorse the Declaration, but not without some reservations.  This talk will provide a comparative assessment of the US and Australia's regard for Indigenous self-government.

Biography

Document: CAEPR Seminar

In his presentation, Professor Anderson will explore possibilities for international Research Partnerships exploring Indigenous economic development activities. The central thrust of the argument will be the increasing relevance of such work beyond the particular Indigenous context, to the broader task facing all people as they respond to society's 'Grand Challenges'. He will do so in three sections, encouraging discussion through-out.

The three sections are:

Context: Three Paradigm Shifts:

Document: CAEPR Seminar

Māori of New Zealand have had varied experiences of colonisation which are often viewed from a large tribal (iwi) perspective.  However the hapū (sub-tribe) is the key cultural and economic group within Māori society.  This presentation will explore the history and contemporary experiences of one hapū from the central North Island.

Document: CAEPR Seminar

This seminar will present a case study about the Ruapehu Whānau Transformation Project (RWT), based in the rural interior of the North Island of Aotearoa (New Zealand).   The RWT began as an iwi-focused project. Over six years later it has become an exemplar of whole-of-community development, led by a local iwi, utilising collective impact and design thinking to regenerate three small towns (Ohakune, Raetihi and Waiouru).

Document: CAEPR Seminar

The requirement to tell suspects about their right to avoid self-incrimination ideally puts all suspects in an equal position at the start of a police interview. However explaining the right to silence to some Aboriginal suspects is notoriously difficult, and lack of understanding may further disadvantage some Aboriginal people who are already over-represented in the criminal justice process. A number of rules and policies attempt to regulate the way NT police communicate the right to silence.

Document: CAEPR Seminar

In November 2000, at the Art Gallery of NSW, Sotheby's auctioned four collaborative paintings created by senior Pintupi Luritja men and women from the communities of Kintore, Mt Liebig and Kiwirrkurra. Their intent was to raise funds to set up a dialysis service in Kintore. What prompted these Aboriginal communities of the Western Desert to give such a high priority to dialysis treatment for kidney disease?

Document: CAEPR Seminar

Researcher Georgina Windley from the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) will facilitate a panel discussion with leading researchers and a VET training manager. The webinar will pull together the latest research, including research by CAEPR researchers Heather Crawford and Associate Professor Nicholas Biddle. It will examine trends in VET participation and associated employment outcomes over the last decade, and student retention and VET completion in remote areas.