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The Australian National University

Seminar Topics—Series 1

Document: CAEPR Seminar

Local involvement in how programs are delivered and implemented is supported by many working in community development and increasingly seen as important in public health, particularly in preventive health programs. Yet there are challenges for national program evaluation when decisions on implementation are devolved. These tensions play out in determining: how to define, standardise and measure national objectives, what measures to use in evaluation and who is responsible for collecting and analysing the data.

Document: CAEPR Seminar

New provisions in the Aboriginal Land Rights Act (ALRA) are forecast to see a six-fold escalation in land recovery from 2017 through negotiated settlement. Criticism of the slow and protracted native title determination in New South Wales will also see more expeditious processing of claims currently in place over more than 35 per cent of the state. These predominant land recovery statutes will have significant crossover with the conservation estate and Aboriginal land management interests, unique land grants (such as Goat Island) and divestment of the Crown Land estate.

Document: CAEPR Seminar

This presentation will focus on initial results from the evaluation of a major new initiative being run by Reconciliation Australia. Narragunnawali is a word from the language of the Ngunnawal people meaning alive, wellbeing, coming together and peace. Narragunnawali: Reconciliation in Schools and Early Learning is designed to support the 21,000+ early learning services, primary and secondary schools in Australia to develop environments that foster a higher level of knowledge and pride in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories, cultures and contributions.

Document: CAEPR Seminar

Abstract:

Document: CAEPR Seminar

Graphing simple data for the ten elections for the Northern Territory Legislative Assembly since 1983, we can see that the 2016 election occupies an extreme position.  The winning party enjoyed a greater seat/vote advantage and the losing party a greater seat/vote disadvantage than in any of the previous nine elections. By exploring a proportionality profile graphic for these ten elections, this seminar will expand on these observations and also show that:

Document: CAEPR Seminar

The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s effort to block the Dakota Access Pipeline is among the most recent Indigenous-led movements connected to climate justice. This presentation seeks to provide an overview of the many different Indigenous-led efforts to achieve climate justice.

Document: CAEPR Seminar

This seminar event is a special collaboration between the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR) and the National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health (NCEPH).

Document: CAEPR Seminar

The talk broadly will examine Indigenous issues as portrayed in the law, and how this affects the preparedness of lawyers to engage with Indigenous people and issues. It will do this primarily by examining how constitutional law is taught in the law school at the ANU (as this is a contemporary issue of significant importance) but also using examples from international law, its impact in Australia and an example or two from the criminal law.

Biography: Asmi Wood is a lawyer who also teaches at the ANU law school.

Document: CAEPR Seminar

Abstract: My research is focussing on positive change in Aboriginal communities. I am keen to examine the factors that enable some successful Aboriginal organisations to contribute to positive change in their communities or regions. We all know successful Aboriginal individuals that shine in sport, music, or politics, for example, but my focus is on broader community outcomes, and how these have been achieved and can be sustained.

Document: CAEPR Seminar

The value of the 'healthy country-healthy people' nexus in promoting physical and psychosocial wellbeing for Aboriginal people in Australia and beyond is the subject of an extensive literature. However, this presentation argues that there is a real question as to these and other putative benefits for Aboriginal communities who are dealing with disruptive social transformations, when only a relatively small proportion of their residents can realistically be engaged in substantive on-country activities, or wish to do so.

about this site Updated: 26 April 2017/ Responsible Officer:  Director, CAEPR / Page Contact:  CAEPR Administrator