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The Australian National University

Seminar Topics—Series 1

Document: CAEPR Seminar

"The excitement and fanfare that surrounds the opening of a new mine is never present when it finally closes" (Laurence 2006: 285).

Document: CAEPR Seminar

This seminar presents data from the 2006, 2011 and 2016 Censuses to analyse the distribution of income within the Indigenous population, and between the Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations. Particular attention is given to the geographic distribution of Indigenous incomes, poverty and inequality.

Document: CAEPR Seminar

The presentation seeks to articulate a broader analysis of the Northern Territory intervention than is usual, drawing on the emerging literature on political settlements to analyse the interests which shape remote Indigenous policy development, and assess their salience in the lead up to the intervention. The presentation explores the intellectual ideas around the concept of 'crisis' and 'intervention' for government policy and examines the interplay between structure and agency in the genesis of the intervention, its aftermath, and into the future.

Document: CAEPR Seminar

 

This paper traces the discursive trajectory of rights restriction under the Northern Territory Emergency Response (the 'Intervention'), the Stronger Futures framework, and the Cashless Debit Card, exploring the interplay between evidence and the requirement that limitations on human rights be proportionate. It also examines the capacity for ongoing interventionist policy development that builds upon the NT Intervention narratives, where proponents present their policy as a 'compassionate' and 'caring' response.

Document: CAEPR Seminar

This seminar will revisit my triangular conceptual framework for Australian Indigenous policy developed a decade ago. That framework identified three competing principles of equality, choice and guardianship. Equality was identified as the dominant principle at the top and centre of the policy space, but with three interpretations: individual legal equality, equality of opportunity and socio-economic equality.

Document: CAEPR Seminar

Indigenous people receive a greater proportion of their income from government income support payments than non-Indigenous Australians. Among those on income support, Indigenous people are also more likely to receive working age payments than the non-Indigenous population. Many of the changes to income support policy since the 1990s are likely to have had a disproportionate impact on the Indigenous population. Those payments that have decreased in generosity (at least in relative terms) are those that Indigenous Australians have a greater exposure to.

Document: CAEPR Seminar

This seminar provides an overview of the changing size and spatial distribution of the Indigenous population of Australia, comparing the results of the 2011 and 2016 censuses. The paper summarises four key aspects of the intercensal change:

a)    the growth in the estimated population of Indigenous Australians;

b)    the changing geographic distribution of  Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons;

c)    the spatial mismatch between demographic projections from the 2011 census and 2016 census counts; and

Document: CAEPR Seminar

The United States and Australia were among the four nations that initially voted against the UN General Assembly's Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.  Each country has since reconsidered its position and ultimately elected to endorse the Declaration, but not without some reservations.  This talk will provide a comparative assessment of the US and Australia's regard for Indigenous self-government.

Biography

Document: CAEPR Seminar

In his presentation, Professor Anderson will explore possibilities for international Research Partnerships exploring Indigenous economic development activities. The central thrust of the argument will be the increasing relevance of such work beyond the particular Indigenous context, to the broader task facing all people as they respond to society's 'Grand Challenges'. He will do so in three sections, encouraging discussion through-out.

The three sections are:

Context: Three Paradigm Shifts: