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The Australian National University

Sarah Prout

Document: Staff Publication

Prout, S. and Howitt, R. 'Frontier imaginings and subversive Indigenous spatialities', Journal of Rural Studies, 25 (4): 396-403.

Document: Staff Publication

Prout, S. 'Vacuums and veils: Engaging with statistically 'invisible' Indigenous population dynamics', Geographical Research, 47 (4): 408-21.

Document: Staff Publication

Prout, S. 'Security and belonging: Reconceptualising Aboriginal mobilities in Yamatji country, Western Australia', Mobilities, 4 (2): 177-202.

Document: Staff Publication

Prout, S. 'Policy, practice and the 'revolving classroom door': Examining the relationship between Aboriginal spatiality and the mainstream education system', Australian Journal of Education, 53 (1): 39-53.

Document: Staff Publication

Prout, S. 'Urban myths: Exploring the unsettling nature of Aboriginal presence in and through a regional Australian town', Urban Policy and Research, 29 (3): 275-91.

Document: Staff Publication

Prout, S. and Yap, M. ‘“No-one’s really aware of where they are”: A case study of Indigenous student mobilities in Australia’s northwest’, International Journal of Educational Research, 54: 9–20.

Document: Staff Publication

Doyle, A. and Prout, S. 'Indigenous student mobility, performance and achievement: Issues of positioning and traceability', International Journal of Educational Research, 54: 41-9.

Document: Working Paper

In the present era of evidence-based policy making in Indigenous affairs, where the monitoring and closure of socioeconomic gaps dominates the federal agenda, data have become paramount. Yet with regard to one of the cornerstones of the Labor government’s ‘Closing the Gaps’ initiative—Indigenous education—the reliability of the evidence base has been repeatedly called into question. Further, existing educational administrative data, as they are conventionally reported, fail to elucidate some of the key structural drivers of Indigenous educational disadvantage.

Document: Working Paper

Indigenous Australians have often been described as highly mobile people—particularly in historical and remote ‘wilderness’ contexts. The literature paints a picture of regular, short-term population movement within and between desert, hinterland, and tropic regions of Australia, with significant implications for targeting and delivering a range of health, housing, and education services in these regions. To date though, very little research has examined the nature of Indigenous temporary mobility in and through urban environments.

Document: Working Paper

Local area population counts and estimates are crucial inputs into policy planning and processes. However, population mobility in general, as well as large numbers of visitors to particular areas, place additional demands on resources and those providing essential services. The literature identifies a pressing need for standardised quantitative measures of the volume, frequency and flows of Indigenous temporary mobility and comparable spatial scales.

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