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The Australian National University

1998

Document: Discussion Paper

This paper is an outcome of a survey of access for Torres Strait Islanders living on the mainland of Australia to government programs and services, commissioned by the Office of Torres Strait Islander Affairs. The survey found that there were no data or statistics on access for Islanders to government programs and services, nor were there any specific government programs and services for mainland Islanders.

Document: Discussion Paper

The concept of paying Aboriginal people compensation based on royalties was first introduced in the early 1950s. Critical ambiguities now exist in this area of policy with respect to the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976 (ALRA) and, more recently, to the future acts regime of the Native Title Act 1993 (NTA).

This paper aims to:

Document: Discussion Paper

This paper presents a preliminary analysis of 1996 Census data relating to female Indigenous sole parents. It confirms results from the 1991 Census which show that sole parent families account for a larger share of Indigenous families than sole parents among other Australian families. Indigenous female sole parents tend to be younger, have larger numbers of children, less education and are less likely to be in employment than other Australian sole parents.

Document: Discussion Paper

The large non-biological, or non-childbirth-related, increases in the Indigenous population cast doubt on how much confidence can be placed in 1996 Census data on Indigenous Australians. The credibility of analysis of 1996 Census data on Indigenous Australians hinges on who the people are who have changed their Indigenous identification between the last two censuses. This paper uses three techniques to indirectly examine this question.

Document: Discussion Paper

The 1996 Census count of Indigenous Australians included a substantial number of individuals who were not recorded as Indigenous by the previous census. This paper considers the implications of this for interpreting change in employment numbers and provides a methodology for reconciling census data.

Document: Discussion Paper

The 1996 Indigenous population of the Northern Territory was very close to the level projected on the basis of 1991 Census figures. This contrasted with the situation in most other States and the Australian Capital Territory where population levels in 1996 were much higher than expected.

Document: Discussion Paper

Census data remain the primary source of information on the economic status of Indigenous Australians in Western Australia, and certainly the most comprehensive. However, some care is required in their interpretation for public policy purposes. In particular, it should be noted that any change in characteristics observed between censuses does not necessarily apply to the population identified at the start of the intercensal period.

Document: Discussion Paper

The 1996 Indigenous population of the Tasmania was very close to the level projected on the basis of 1991 Census figures. This contrasted with the situation in most other States and the Australian Capital Territory where population levels in 1996 were much higher than expected.

Document: Discussion Paper

Policy makers will be in a better position to facilitate the transition from welfare to work if they have a detailed understanding of the incentives facing the potential Indigenous workforce. Distinguishing the expected gains from becoming employed (captured by the replacement rate) from the expected loss of becoming unemployed (estimated in cost of job loss) is a prerequisite for developing a policy framework which ensures that more Indigenous workers have an incentive to look for, secure and keep jobs.

Document: Discussion Paper

This study examines the determinants of the educational attainment of young Indigenous Australians using data from the last three censuses and the 1994 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Survey (NATSIS).

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