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The Australian National University

Seminars

Jon Altman
Haydon Allen G052 (Quadrangle, near ANU Union), Australian National University
Wednesday, 19 September 2012 , 12.30 - 2.00pm

Over the past four decades Aboriginal people living in remote Australia have been empowered by land rights and native title laws to claim back large tracts of their ancestral lands. Today the Indigenous estate covers over 20 per cent of the continent and includes areas of globally significant biodiversity and cultural value, many now declared as Indigenous Protected Areas within the National Reserve System. However, none of the Indigenous estate is in pre-colonial condition and it faces a myriad of environmental threats.

Jon Altman , Nicholas Biddle , Geoff Buchanan
Haydon-Allen Tank, The Australian National University, Canberra.
Tuesday, 12 April 2011 , 11.20 - 12.10pm

This paper was presented by Jon Altman at the 'Social Science Perspectives on the 2008 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey' conference, 11-12 April 2001, The Australian National University, Canberra. The session title was 'Income, work and engagement in market and non-market activities'.

Emma Williams
Eileen Cummings
School of Cultural Inquiry Conference Room, First Floor, A.D. Hope Bldg #14 (opposite Chifley Library), The Australian National University, Canberra.
Wednesday, 23 March 2011 , 12.30 - 2.00pm

Abstract: The authors were commissioned by a branch of the NT Government to research workforce development issues in remote communities, focusing on the employment of local Indigenous community members in work related to family support and community safety.

Adrian Fordham , Bill Fogarty
Humanities Conference Room, First Floor, A.D. Hope Bldg #14 (opposite Chifley Library), The Australian National University, Canberra.
Wednesday, 14 October 2009 , 12.30 - 2.00pm

This seminar examines the viability of a wildlife enterprise in Maningrida that targets animal three species for commercial sale: saltwater crocodiles, northern long-necked turtles and tarantula spiders. Whilst the crocodile and turtle industries are well established, the tarantula spider industry is an emergent industry. The seminar will focus upon the broad range of factors influencing the development of the enterprise and its on-going viability. Particular attention will be paid to:

Geoff Buchanan ,
Daniel Oades
Mark Shadforth
Humanities Conference Room, First Floor, A.D. Hope Bldg #14 (opposite Chifley Library), The Australian National University, Canberra.
Wednesday, 27 August 2008 , 12.30 - 2.00pm

Since late 2006 CAEPR has worked on a collaborative research project with the Bardi Jawi Rangers based on the northern tip of the Dampier Peninsula in the West Kimberley region of Western Australia. This research was commissioned by the North Australian Indigenous Land and Sea Management Alliance (NAILMSA) as part of its NHT-funded Dugong and Marine Turtle Project and was also supported by the Kimberley Land Council (KLC) as a major project partner.

Seán Kerins
Humanities Conference Room, First Floor, A.D. Hope Bldg #14 (opposite Chifley Library), The Australian National University, Canberra.
Wednesday, 30 April 2008 , 12.30 - 2.00pm

Aboriginal People in the tropical savannah of the Northern Territory (NT) own 170,000 sq km of land including 85% of the coastline. Land and sea country have great cultural, economic and social significance to Aboriginal people, underpinning their culture and society. Aboriginal landowners continue to be reliant on the natural environment for both spiritual and physical well-being. Creation ancestors form part of a living landscape and practices such as hunting, foraging, burning, caring for sacred sites and ceremony have an important place in contemporary Aboriginal life.

William Sanders
Humanities Conference Room, First Floor, A.D. Hope Bldg #14 (opposite Chifley Library), The Australian National University, Canberra.
Wednesday, 13 August 2008 , 12.30 - 2.00pm

The Community Development Employment Projects (CDEP) scheme has been subject to major criticism in recent years for being part of, or little better than, Aboriginal welfare dependence. In the first half of this seminar I will defend CDEP from its critics, by both recounting its origins and elaborating on some of its strengths; most notably its flexibility and support for Indigenous community-based organisations, particularly in remote areas. I will argue that CDEP is a remote Australian policy treasure, but that despite this labeling CDEP does have some weaknesses.

Murray Garde
Humanities Conference Room, First Floor, A.D. Hope Bldg #14 (opposite Chifley Library), The Australian National University, Canberra.
Wednesday, 25 March 2009 , 12.30 - 2.00pm

The recent development of a new sub-discipline of linguistics known as 'documentary linguistics' has placed a new focus on the recording of knowledge that speakers of endangered languages have across a range of semantic fields, including those in the natural sciences. The recording of Indigenous ecological knowledge is not new in Australia, but its application to land management has only recently been considered with any seriousness. The issue of Aboriginal burning practices is now (again) a rather poignant case in point.

Janet Hunt
Humanities Conference Room, First Floor, A.D. Hope Bldg #14 (opposite Chifley Library), The Australian National University, Canberra.
Wednesday, 8 April 2009 , 12.30 - 2.00pm

There exists a growing body of literature about the benefits to Indigenous people, as well as to the environment, of living on and caring for land and sea country. However, most of these findings emanate from Northern Australia, where Aboriginal people are usually working on their own Aboriginal-owned or -controlled land. NSW is the state with the largest absolute number of Indigenous people, but their landholdings comprise less than one per cent of the state.

Jerry Schwab , Bill Fogarty
Humanities Conference Room, First Floor, A.D. Hope Bldg #14 (opposite Chifley Library), The Australian National University, Canberra.
Wednesday, 15 April 2009 , 12.30 - 2.00pm

The educational and social disengagement of Indigenous youth in many remote communities in Northern Aus