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The Australian National University

Indigenous Education

Document: 2011 Census Papers

Using a range of data—including the newly released Australian Census Longitudinal Dataset—this report presents a profile of Indigenous tertiary students and higher educational outcomes. An earlier report in this series reported improvements in the rate of Indigenous high school completion, both in absolute terms and relative to the non-Indigenous population.

Document: Working Paper

Substantial recent growth in the number of Indigenous businesses means that the need for business-related skills in the Indigenous population will be greater than ever. This report reviews the existing literature relating to Indigenous students and business-related studies in Australia, and provides a snapshot of Indigenous students' participation in, and completion of, business-related higher education courses.

Document: Working Paper

This report examines trends in participation in vocational education and training, and attainment of vocational qualifications, among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people during 2002–15. The report also investigates whether Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with a higher-level vocational qualification are more likely to subsequently gain employment than those with a lower-level vocational qualification.

Document: CAEPR Seminar

This presentation will focus on initial results from the evaluation of a major new initiative being run by Reconciliation Australia. Narragunnawali is a word from the language of the Ngunnawal people meaning alive, wellbeing, coming together and peace. Narragunnawali: Reconciliation in Schools and Early Learning is designed to support the 21,000+ early learning services, primary and secondary schools in Australia to develop environments that foster a higher level of knowledge and pride in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories, cultures and contributions.

Document: Working Paper

This paper reviews literature related to the intersectionality of gender and educational attainment, with a special focus on the circumstances surrounding the Australian Indigenous population. Using two sources of data, the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) and the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), we conducted difference-in-difference analyses to better understand differences by gender between the non-Indigenous and the Indigenous in school attendance, school persistence and test scores.

Document: Working Paper

Many factors contribute to differences in an individual’s command over resources. One of the factors is differences in labour market engagement and the level of education attainment across different geographical areas. However, existing analysis of the Closing the Gap outcomes is limited by the lack of adequate wage data for Indigenous Australians.

Document: 2011 Census Papers

Using data from the two most recent censuses, the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) and the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC), this paper aims to provide an up-to-date picture of the schooling experience of Indigenous children. The major finding from the census analysis is that there have been significant improvements in the rate of Indigenous high school completion, both in absolute terms and relative to the non-Indigenous population.

Document: 2011 Census Papers

The aim of this paper is to provide an updated description of the level of participation of Indigenous children in early childhood education, as well as an analysis of the differences in outcomes between those children who do and do not attend.

Document: Working Paper

With the continuing high levels of Indigenous youth unemployment and low levels of school attendance among Indigenous youth, Indigenous communities and education systems are seeking new approaches to increase Indigenous youth participation in education, training and employment. This priority among Indigenous and government stakeholders is not restricted to Australia but also applies internationally among many Indigenous peoples. One potential source of employment is the natural resources sector.

about this site Updated: 24 May 2017/ Responsible Officer:  Director, CAEPR / Page Contact:  CAEPR Administrator