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The Australian National University

John Taylor

Document: CAEPR Seminar

In the age of 'big data' debates about 'data sovereignty' have been dominated by national governments and multinational corporations focused on issues of access and legal jurisdiction. Missing from those conversations has been consideration of the inherent rights and interests of indigenous peoples regarding the collection, ownership and application of data about their people, lifeways and territories. In this seminar I report on new thinking and emerging practice regarding an assertion of 'indigenous data sovereignty'.

Document: Research Monograph

As the global ‘data revolution’ accelerates, how can the data rights and interests of indigenous peoples be secured? Premised on the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, this book argues that indigenous peoples have inherent and inalienable rights relating to the collection, ownership and application of data about them, and about their lifeways and territories. As the first book to focus on indigenous data sovereignty, it asks: what does data sovereignty mean for indigenous peoples, and how is it being used in their pursuit of self-determination?

Document: Staff Publication

Taylor, J. ‘Population futures in the Australian desert, 2001–16’, Australian Geographer, 34 (3): 355–70.

Document: Staff Publication

Taylor, J. ‘Indigenous peoples’, in P. Demeny and G. McNicoll (eds.), The Encyclopedia of Population, Macmillan, New York, pp. 523–27.

Document: Staff Publication

Taylor, J. ‘Indigenous Australians: The first transformation’, in S.E. Khoo and P. McDonald (eds.), The Transformation of Australia’s Population: 1970–2030, University of New South Wales Press, Sydney, pp. 17–40.

Document: Staff Publication

Taylor, J. Aboriginal Population Profiles for Development Planning in the Northern East Kimberley, CAEPR Research Monograph No. 23, CAEPR, ANU, Canberra, xviii+124pp.